Workers in 60 cities joined the strike to fight for $15 an hour -- double what most currently earn. Organizers also called for the right to form a union without retaliation.


The protest movement first began in New York last November with a strike by 200 workers. It soon spread across the country with strikes in Chicago, Detroit, Flint, Kansas City, Milwaukee and St Louis.

 

VOR's Carmen Russell-Sluchansky reports:

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Organizers said this week's strike was targeting more than 1,000 major fast-food restaurants including franchises McDonald's, Wendy's, Taco Bell, Burger King, Pizza Hut and KFC. According to labor coalition group Fight for 15, Los Angeles, Denver, Phoenix, Indianapolis and Kansas City were just a few of the new cities seeing striking workers.

Labor leaders argue that many of the three million fast-food workers in America don't work full-time, adding to their financial woes.

During the previous strike in July, McDonald's said workers' individual contracts were a matter for the franchisees, who operate more than 80 percent of the company's outlets around the world.

The company said in a statement: "Employees are paid competitive wages and have access to a range of benefits to meet their individual needs."

Kyle King, a Burger King employee protesting in Boston, said that's just not true, noting $8.15 an hour working at Burger King doesn't go far after adding in subway fares and monthly bills.