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  • The threat of Islamic extremism to the UK continues to fuel debate within British politics and today PM David Cameron unveiled new plans to counter extremism. The government now plans to give the police new powers to seize the passports of terrorist suspects and stop British jihadists from returning to the UK. VoR's Simon Parker reports.

  • A prominent Canadian blogger and Russia expert has voiced concerns over potential NATO expansion and western allegations concerning Russia's involvement in Ukraine. Dr. Patrick Armstrong, claims that the physical evidence for Russia's so-called 'invasion' is unconvincing. VoR's Tim Ecott spoke to him.

  • A group of academic researchers in Scotland have expressed fears over a brain drain if the pro-independence lobby wins on September 18. Professor Richard Cogdell from the Biology department of Glasgow University spoke to VoR's Tim Ecott about his concerns.

News
  • The threat of Islamic extremism to the UK continues to fuel debate within British politics and today PM David Cameron unveiled new plans to counter extremism. The government now plans to give the police new powers to seize the passports of terrorist suspects and stop British jihadists from returning to the UK. VoR's Simon Parker reports.

  • A prominent Canadian blogger and Russia expert has voiced concerns over potential NATO expansion and western allegations concerning Russia's involvement in Ukraine. Dr. Patrick Armstrong, claims that the physical evidence for Russia's so-called 'invasion' is unconvincing. VoR's Tim Ecott spoke to him.

  • A group of academic researchers in Scotland have expressed fears over a brain drain if the pro-independence lobby wins on September 18. Professor Richard Cogdell from the Biology department of Glasgow University spoke to VoR's Tim Ecott about his concerns.

VoR Debate
  • Britain has been put on severe alert for terrorism following the killing of US journalist James Foley by Islamic State, overseen by a man with a London accent. PM David Cameron has warned of 500 Britons fighting for Islamic State (ISIS/ISIL), but faces a greater threat at home. VoR's Brendan Cole hosts a debate.

  • Pubs in Britain are closing at the rate of 28 a week. To its supporters, the pub is a great British institution that is part of the fabric of society.  While not quite on the endangered species list just yet, what is the future of the British pub? VoR's Brendan Cole discusses the fate of the great British boozer.

  • Outrage over Ireland’s abortion laws is nothing new, and the most recent case concerning what many call unworkable legislation this week triggered fresh protests worldwide. In London, more than 150 people gathered outside the Irish Embassy holding posters bearing slogans such as ‘I am not a vessel’ and ‘this brutality makes me ashamed to be Irish’. VoR's Natasha Moriarty hosts a discussion.

Telling It Like It Is
  • The Rotherham child abuse scandal, the defection of Conservative MP Douglas Carswell from the Tories to UKIP, the Scottish referendum debate and the merits of the singer Kate Bush are among the topics discussed by David Coburn, the UKIP MEP for Scotland and the former Kremlin adviser, Alexander Nekrassov in this week’s Telling It Like It Is. VoR's Brendan Cole mediates.

     

  • The British response to the rescue of the persecuted Yazidi sect in Iraq; the death of actor Robin Williams and the appeal of real ale in the UK are among the topics discussed in Telling It Like It Is. Joining Brendan Cole is Maggie Pagano of the Independent newspaper and Alexander Nekrassov, the political analyst.

  • The journalist Maggie Pagano and the former Kremlin advisor and political analyst Alexander Nekrassov join VoR's Brendan Cole to discuss the week's events. They talk about the crisis in Gaza, Boris Johnson announcing that he will stand as an British MP, the Scottish independence TV debate and sanctions between Russia and the west.

Talking Points
  • The economic question of the day has suddenly become: ‘Is the global economy about to slide into another recession?’ In this Talking Point, Dr Jack Rasmus gives his view of the economic effects of the coup in Ukraine, USA-driven sanctions on Russia, and the weakening of the world economy.

     

     

  • As John Tefft takes over from Michael Anthony McFaul as the US ambassador in Russia, Eric Kraus looks at McFaul's legacy and says the US government's decision to apply more sanctions on Russia is a grave mistake.

  • Would people in Britain understand Russia's position on Ukraine if it had a situation closer to home with which to empathise? Imagine a scenario where Scotland were to be independent and a similar course of action that is taking place in Ukraine happened. Ian Sumter, a Moscow-based British journalist explains.

Debating Russia
  • The presidents of Russia and Ukraine have shaken hands in Minsk. Beyond that fact, Ukraine’s civil war rages on as the country faces serious economic breakdown. On this edition of the programme Peter Lavelle discusses where Ukraine is heading.

     

  • Gaza is again under Israeli attack. What makes this assault different from past attacks? Should we stop talking about a peace process? And what role can countries like Russia play to finally resolve this conflict? Peter Lavelle hosts the latest edition of Debating Russia.

  • Ukraine and the EU Association agreement: It is hotly debated whether Kiev’s signature on this agreement will result in a more modern and prosperous Ukraine or a country that will experience extreme economic pain and long term austerity. VoR's Peter Lavelle hosts a discussion.

In Conversation
  • It’s long been said that we are what we eat. For many of us in the developed world almost everything we eat comes from commercially produced animals and crops, and is bought from supermarkets. A new book lifts the lid on the dangers of mass food production both for human health and for the health of the planet. VoR's Tim Ecott spoke to Philip Lymbery, one of the joint authors of Farmageddon: the true cost of cheap meat.

  • Australian by birth, author and adventurer Tim Cope decided to train as a wilderness guide in Finland. That led to an adventure riding across Russia to China by bicycle and then to a bolder journey on horseback across Mongolia all the way east to Kazakhstan and Ukraine eventually ending up in Hungary. The journey took three years and his story is told in On the Trail of Genghis Khan: An Epic Journey through the Land of the Nomads. VoR’s Tim Ecott talks to Tim Cope.

  • In this edition of In Conversation, VoR's Tim Ecott talks to Christian Wolmar, Britain’s foremost writer on railways. His latest book is called To the Edge of the World: The Story of the Trans-Siberian Railway. Wolmar, who has himself travelled the line, describes the building of the Trans-Siberian as possibly the greatest human engineering achievement. I asked him what it was about the railway that inspired him.

     

Curtain Up
  • Families from all over England travel down to London to see the Nutcracker ballet at Christmas. But it wasn’t always such a hit. VoR's Alice Lagnado invited Russian music expert Daniel Jaffe into the studio and began by asking him how the ballet was first greeted back in the late 19th century.

  • The ballet world is going through a difficult time in Russia, with courtroom trials and a change in management at the renowned Vaganova academy in St Petersburg. VoR’s Alice Lagnado takes a further look.

  • In this edition of Curtain Up, VoR’s Alice Lagnado talks to conductor Alice Farnham, who is bringing Britten’s opera The Rape of Lucretia to the Mariinsky Theatre this month. It’s her first time conducting at the Mariinsky, and it’s also the first time the opera has been performed at the theatre.

Features
  • Graham Phillips is a 35-year-old civil servant turned blogger from Nottingham who shot to fame when he started reporting from Ukraine as a freelancer for RT, the Russian television channel. But what made this young man from Nottingham go to Ukraine, a country where he did not speak the language or have any ties, in the first place?

  • Russia's top Antarctic scientists are hoping to penetrate Lake Vostok for the second time this autumn and obtain pristine samples of its water, which will provide clues to the climate of the past and the future.

  • At the beginning of the new film Hermitage Revealed, director and narrator Margy Kinmonth says that the story of this grand old museum is a microcosm of Russian history. VoR's Alice Lagnado spoke to Kinmonth about the film.

Galleries
  • A vintage car exhibition displaying unique models of Soviet automobiles from the 1930-1970s has opened in GUM, the main Russian department store on Red Square in Moscow. Here's a selection of the sleek creatures for automobile geeks who can't make it to GUM by September 28, when the exhibition closes.

  • Rossiya Segodnya photojournalist Andrei Stenin, who has been held in Ukraine - ostensibly arrested by the Ukrainian Security Service on charges of assisting terrorists - has a respected reputation for images of conflicts around the globe. Here, we present some of his world-class photographs.

  • A total of over $22 million will be allocated from Russia's federal budget to restore the ensemble of the Solovetsky Islands, a UNESCO World Heritage site, the deputy prime minister said on Monday.

All programmes
  • The execution of the journalist James Foley, the media frenzy surrounding Sir Cliff Richard and the press conference given by Wikileaks founder Julian Assange are among the subjects tackled by the Independent journalist Maggie Pagano and the political analyst and former Kremlin adviser, Alexander Nekrassov. Joining them is VoR's Brendan Cole.

  • It is not exaggeration to say that Russian President Vladimir Putin is the most recognisable leader in the world today. He is also regularly demonised by the West. What is it about Putin that captures the imagination of so many? Peter Lavelle hosts a discussion.

  • Western sanctions against Russia have engendered a decisive backlash from Moscow. Russia has returned the favour. Where is this going and is there a way back to normal relations between them? Peter Lavelle hosts a discussion.

Featured
World

The United States has criticised Israel’s announcement of a new land appropriation in the West Bank, labelling it as “counterproductive” to any peace efforts.

Remembrance ceremonies are taking place in Russia this week to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Beslan school siege, in which hundreds, including 186 children, lost their lives. An exhibition of photographs by British-born photographer James Hill, documenting the massacre, opens on September 4 in Moscow, coinciding with the anniversary.

 

The largest ever investigation into Britain's housing tenants has found that only 25% of tenants surveyed fully understand the government's welfare reforms and how they will affect them. VoR's Tim Walklate spoke to Richard Blundell CEO of Housing Partners  which provides technology solutions for housing associations and local authorities.

Representatives of the self-proclaimed Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (LPR and DPR) in eastern Ukraine said today they will make every effort to maintain Ukraine's unity if Kiev accepts the demands they have brought to the table for the new round of talks in Minsk on the country's crisis.

 

Russian President Vladimir Putin said today that he hoped “common sense” would prevail amid the threat of more sanctions to be imposed on Russia by the European Union.

Russia's Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov today reiterated his country's commitment to a peaceful settlement in Ukraine, and urged the US and EU to demand that Kiev stop using heavy weaponry against civilians. He also said the West and Russia could restore cooperative relations, but "it is necessary to give up the absolutely hopeless policy of ultimatums, threats and sanctions” to achieve this.