16 December 2012, 10:01

RAIPON

RAIPON
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Today we are returning to look at one of the most interesting and controversial geographic areas of our world today in terms of the environment; that is, at the Arctic.

Today we are returning to look at one of the most interesting and controversial geographic areas of our world today in terms of the environment; that is, at the Arctic.

The indigenous peoples who live in the Russian part of the Arctic have been represented within Russia since 1999 by an organisation called RAIPON, standing for Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and Far East. This organisation lobbies for the interests on a governmental level of about 250,000 people, who made up of members 41 indigenous groups including the Aleut, Yupik and Inuit (Iñupiat) peoples living on Russian territory. RAIPON also works as a consultative body with relevant UN organizations and is, or at least was a permanent member of the influential Arctic Council, which was founded by the eight Arctic countries: Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Island, Canada, USA, and Russia in 1996.

But, on November the first of this year, activities of RAIPON were suspended. Rodion Sulyandziga the First vice-president of RAIPON, Roman Dolgov, Greenpeace Russia Arctic campaigner, and on the phone from Denmark, Jon Burgwald, who is a Greenpeace Nordic Arctic Campaigner discuss the situation.

 

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