22 March, 06:25

Top 10 jobs that most likely to attract psychopaths

Top 10 jobs that most likely to attract psychopaths

In today’s turbulent world, many people may wonder if the person with whom they work just might be the next psychopath to make news headlines. There are more psychopaths are CEOs than any other profession, according to an author who spent time researching the common denominators between successful people and sanity.

First off, psychopath doesn't just mean someone who cuts you up with a chainsaw — though the majority of people who do things like that are psychopaths. The clinical diagnosis refers to those who have shallow emotions or who lack empathy and guilt, are coldhearted, superficial, manipulative, impulsive or irresponsible.

In what’s been billed as one of the most overlooked books of recent years — “The Wisdom of Psychopaths: What Saints, Spies and Serial Killers Can Teach Us About Success” — author Kevin Dutton finds that CEOs lead the list in terms of most psychopathic persons. That’s followed by lawyers, and then by members of television and radio media, Time reported. Numbers four and five are salesperson and surgeon — and then the media makes the list again, with the number six slot held by journalists.

Psychologist Kevin Dutton, author of “The Wisdom of Psychopaths: What Saints, Spies, and Serial Killers Can Teach Us About Success,” has created a top 10 list for the most attractive and least attractive professions for psychopaths.

Dutton claims the professions that seem to have the most psychopaths are:

1. Chief executive officer
2. Lawyer
3. Media (Television/Radio)
4. Salesperson
5. Surgeon
6. Journalist
7. Police officer
8. Clergy person
9. Chef
10. Civil servant

These positions either carry much weight in the eyes of the world, or offer substantial opportunity at power and control. Moreover, some of the jobs require a talent at making clinical, emotionally removed decisions — tapping into a psychopath’s natural inclinations, the author found.

The Voice of Russia, wnd.com, washingtontimes.com

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