28 July 2013, 23:40

After sex scandal, Anthony Weiner still to run for New York's mayor

Anthony Weiner, who is running for the New York City's mayor and who has acknowledged of having been involved in a sex scandal, says that although his campaign's manager is resigning, he, Weiner, is continuing to run for the mayor's post.

Earlier, Mr. Weiner had acknowledged he had sent racy online messages and lewd photos to several women. After that, Danny Kedem said that he didn't want to be Weiner's campaign's manager any more.

Danny Kedem has worked on Hilary Clinton presidential campaign in 2008 and managed the re-election of John DeStefano to the 10th term of New Haven's mayor in 2011.

It is still unknown who will replace Mr. Kedem as the manager of Anthony Weiner's campaign.

On Sunday, Mr. Weiner's rival Christine Quinn accused him of “reckless behavior” and “lack of maturity and responsibility.”

“I don't think he should be major, and I think the voters, if he stays in the race, will make that clear,” Ms. Quinn said.

Christine Quinn lead the race before Weiner joined it, but slipped behind him over the past 2 months. However, after Weiner acknowledged the facts of racy messages, Quinn is leading again.

In his recent speech, Weiner spoke about his readiness to fight for the interests of “the middle class and people struggling to make it every single day”.

The New York's mayoral primary is planned for September 10, and the general election – for November 5.

 


NY mayoral candidate Weiner wants second chance, hinting at Schwarzenegger, Strauss-Kahn and Clinton sex scandals

Ekaterina Scherbakova

Anthony Weiner’s favorability has fallen by more than 20 points after acknowledging he exchanged sex messages with young girls via the Internet and had sex on the phone. But the sex scandal doesn’t seem to bother New Yorkers, as 47 percent of respondents agree to give him another chance.

Christine Quinn, from the Democratic Party, and the main Weiner’s rival, scored 25 percent to 16 percent of voices after the new revelations about Weiner’s sex scandal were made public, according to the NBC 4 New York/ Wall Street Journal/ Marist Poll. In June, the same poll showed that, Weiner had been leading 25 percent to 20 percent.

New York Democrats’ view of Weiner also took a hit. Now 55 percent of Democrats view Weiner unfavorably, and only 30 percent favorably, compared to June when 52 percent had a favorable view of him, and 36 percent who did not.

Alex Stevenson, journalist with the Politico.co.uk, believes that if New York is going to vote for Weiner it would mean that the world has gone mad.

“A man takes pictures of his penis and sends them to girls who are not his wife. He is caught, resigns from Congress, and then engages in another online liaison under the nickname 'Carlos Danger'. And then asks the people of New York to vote him in as their new mayor. Does Weiner really think he can wriggle out of this one?” Stevenson writes. “But if Anthony Weiner gets away with his latest sex scandal and becomes New York's next mayor, the world will truly have gone mad,” he adds.

Are the apologies that Anthony Weiner brought to New Yorkers seem to be enough? Weiner asked to give him a "second chance", saying that such sex scandals “frankly had happened before". Of course, it happened before.

Former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger was caught in 2011 when he had an affair with his housekeeper Mildred Baena and fathered a son with her. The illicit relationship prompted the end of his marriage. Journalist Maria Shriver, 57, filed for divorce in July 2011, citing irreconcilable differences.

Former International Monetary Fund chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn ended his career in 2012 when New York hotel maid Nafissatou Diallo accused him of sexual assault. Diallo, a 33-year-old housekeeper from Guinea, told police Strauss-Kahn forced her to perform oral sex, tried to rape her and tore a ligament in her shoulder after she arrived to clean his suite. The 63-year-old Strauss-Kahn, who has since separated from his wife, has said what happened was "a moral failing" but was consensual. The allegations led to his arrest, forced him to resign his IMF post and cut off the Socialist's potential candidacy for the French presidency. But in the end all charges have since been dropped.

Tiger Woods, prominent golfer, although he is not a politician, temporary ended his career after admitting he had sexual affair with 15 women, including three to be porn stars. At that time Woods was married with two children. The sex scandal revelations forced Woods to take “indefinite break from professional golf”, according to the statement he made at that time. In addition, following Woods' admission of infidelity, several companies including Accenture, AT&T, Gatorade and General Motors completely ended their sponsorship deals with Woods.

Former New Jersey governor Jim McGreevey, resigned in 2004 after an affair with a male staffer. At that time he was also married with two children. After the scandal revelations he admitted he was cheating on his wife Dina and filed for divorce.

And of course, everyone remember Clinton-Lewinsky sex-scandal, that emerged in 1998. The sexual relationship between US President Bill Clinton and a 22-year-old White House Intern, Monica Lewinsky, ended with impeachment of President Clinton in 1998 by the US House of Representatives and his subsequent acquittal on all impeachment charges of perjury and obstruction of justice in a 21-day Senate trial. Lewinsky claimed to have had sexual encounters with Bill Clinton on nine occasions.

And now, it seems that New Yorkers are quite indifferent to sex scandals among politicians. When they were asked whether Weiner deserves another chance or if he did not have the character to be mayor, 47 percent said he should have another chance while 45 percent said he did not have the character. Men were more likely than women to give him another chance. On another question, whether Weiner should quit the race, 47 percent of Democrats said he should not, and only 43 percent said he should.

Voice of Russia, Washington Post

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