4 August 2013, 22:25

FEMA building camps to house millions - Ken Adachi

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Rex 84, or Readiness Exercise 1984, was a secretive scenario and drill developed by the US federal government to suspend the US Constitution, declare martial law and place military commanders in charge of state and local governments and detain large numbers of American citizens who are deemed to be a national security threat in the event the President declares a state of domestic national emergency.

The plan, Rex 84 states that events that might cause such a declaration might be widespread US opposition, for example to a US military invasion abroad, such as if the US were to directly invade Central America, to combat what the government perceived as “subversive activities.”

The plan also authorized the military to direct ordered movements of civilian populations at state and regional levels. Such a plan would call for the building of large facilities to house those dissidents.

In a course of such an event, the responsibility for the detaining and housing US citizens would come under the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Information which has appeared on the Internet has shown that FEMA is building detention facilities all over the US. There are claims on the Internet and in alternative media that over 800 such facilities have been built. However the US government continues to deny the existence of such locations.

 

Hello. This is John Robles. I’m speaking with Mr. Ken Adachi, the owner and the editor of educate-yourself.org.

Robles: There have been some revelations recently on the Internet about some FEMA internment camps that have been appearing in the US, and the name of Ted Gunderson came up. I believe you were a good friend of his for about 13 years. He was a former FBI bureau chief, and he was with the bureau for about 30 years, I believe. Can you tell us a little bit about Mr. Gunderson and your relationship to him? I’d also like to ask you about these FEMA camps, if possible.

Adachi: Ted Gunderson was with the FBI for about 27 years or so. He retired in 1979 and became a private investigator. I first saw him or heard him in 1998, had a talk to him locally and we became more close with each other in 1999.

I began to share some information with him that I had been acquiring over the years. There had been a lot in his own investigative work, and camps were one area that Ted had talked about, but not the only one that Ted talked about or written articles about, these FEMA detention centers. But he certainly did cover it as one of his areas of investigation.

FEMA was established in 1979 under the Carter Administration, and I believe that in the late 1980s to early 1990s FEMA began building detention centers all over the continent, the US, and Alaska, and Hawaii, and other US possessions around the world.

Ted retired from the FBI in 1979 and became a private investigator from his retirement till the time he passed away in 2011. So, this work we are talking about is Ted’s private investigation on the camps. He was not connected with the FBI at that point. Ted did this as a private investigator, researcher who was digging up information about FEMA camps.

FEMA was not created until 1979. At that time Ted had retired, and when he was with the FBI there was no FEMA. So all of this investigative work – let’s say research work – was done mostly in the 1990s and in the 2000 decade, when most of the detention centers were being built in the US.

Many his articles about the detention centers – Ted said there were well over 800 of them – and some of them have the capacity to hold very large numbers of people, in some cases between 2-5 million people. I’ve read that one camp that is located on an island off Alaska can hold up to 5 million people.

Robles: Five million people off the coast of Alaska? In your opinion, why would they build such a horrendous-sounding place?

Adachi: There is no official explanation for the purpose of building this detention center – and has never been. Even the existence of them has never been – let’s say –made known by the government. Local people have taken photos of these camps. They live in the areas where the construction has taken place, so they have been photographed, etc. So, you’d think all the information has appeared on the Internet.

But because the government has not openly stated anything about these centers at all, there is no justification presented at all. So the people wrote to their Congress people and inquired about this, but got back either a nonsensical reply like ‘we’ve never heard of that so we don’t believe they exist,’ or they were told those were just routine emergency centers pending an event such as when we need bases for earthquake victims and that type of thing.

There is no adequate explanation by the government to this date for the building of these high-security detention centers with very high fences with barbed wire that’s pointed inward.

These so-called “detention centers” are intended to keep people in, in much the way Nazi concentration camps were designed to keep people in. And the reason Ted talked about it is that it’s very disturbing information. What country in the world would build all these detention centers without stating the reason for it?

Robles: You are saying there are 800 of these?

Adachi: I can’t confirm it. I’ve read on the internet that there are over 800 of these centers.

Robles: How well documented is the one you were speaking about, off Alaska?

Adachi: I did read about it from a couple of sources. I’ve seen videos. If you do a YouTube search and fill in “detention centers,” you’ll see videos of people who took videos outside these detention camps.

There’s a very good reason for heightened concern. I don’t know the extent of it. I first learnt about this in the late 90s. There was a former military man, a chaplain. Emettson, I believe, was the name. He is a former army chaplain.

He started to report about these centers. I heard it on a radio show, and I was taken aback. Then later, I started to research the Internet and other people were talking about it. So, if you simply do a Google search and fill in “detention camps,” you will come up with thousands of articles that talk about this and many other cases.

Robles: Very disturbing, what you have said about the camp that can hold 5 million people off Alaska. I believe these are not even five million people in Alaska itself, are there.

Adachi: I’m rather worried, you know, that it’s such a remote location. Imagine, if people get transported to this island in a high-security enclosure, so they have a little chance of getting out. And let’s say they did, where would they go? It’s like a devil’s island.

That’s really bad news for all of us. We are concerned that the alternative purpose for these camps would be to house very large numbers of American citizens who aren’t willing to play ball with the New World Order or takeover of America.

This country is being subverted through subterfuge and deceit into a fascist police state, and not all of us are pleased with those who are trying to subvert and nullify the right guaranteed by the US constitution. That’s why I’m talking to you here. I’m very much interested in preserving the constitutional framework that has characterized the US since its inception.

Robles: Mr. Gunderson was also interested in protecting the constitution.

Adachi: Absolutely! This was his prime motivation – as everyone who understands the great miracle that was the US. And we want to not allow it to pass into oblivion. That’s why we are talking.

 

End of Part 1 of the interview

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