9 November 2012, 14:32

‘My enemy is terrorism and instability in Syria’ - Assad in exclusive interview with Russian TV channel

‘My enemy is terrorism and instability in Syria’ - Assad in exclusive interview with Russian TV channel

In an exclusive interview with russian TV channel, President Bashar Assad said that the conflict in Syria is not a civil war, but proxy terrorism by Syrians and foreign fighters. He also accused the Turkish president of eyeing Syria with imperial ambitions.

Assad said that the West creates scapegoats as enemies – from communism, to Islam, to Saddam Hussein. He accused Western countries of aiming to turn him into their next enemy.

"My enemy is terrorism and instability in Syria. This is our enemy in Syria. It is not about the people, it is not about persons. The whole issue is not about me staying or leaving. It is about the country being safe or not. So, this is the enemy we have been fighting as Syria", Syrian president Bashar Assad said answering a question who his enemy at this point was.

Assad believes that he is the man who can put an end to the conflict and restore peace:

"I have to be the man who can do that and I hope so, but it is not about the power of the President; it is about the whole society. We have to be precise about this. The president cannot do anything without the institutions and without the support of the people. So, the fight now is not a President’s fight; it is Syrians’ fight. Every Syrian is involved in defending his country now.[...] We do not have a civil war. It is about terrorism and the support coming from abroad to terrorists to destabilize Syria. This is our war."

Answering the question how much time he needs to crush the enemy Assad said:

"You cannot answer this question because no one claimed that he had the answer about when to end the war unless when we have the answer to when they are going to stop smuggling foreign fighters from different parts of the world especially the Middle East and the Islamic world, and when they are going to stop sending armaments to those terrorists. If they stop, this is when I can answer you; I can tell that in weeks we can finish everything."

Speaking about Syrian-Turkish relations President Assad said the following::

"Turkish people need good relations with the Syrian people. Erdogan thinks that if Muslim Brotherhood takes over in the region and especially in Syria, he can guarantee his political future, this is one reason. The other reason, he personally thinks that he is the new sultan of the Ottoman and he can control the region as it was during the Ottoman Empire under a new umbrella. In his heart he thinks he is a caliph. These are the main two reasons for him to shift his policy from zero problems to zero friends."

Intervention in Syria would destabilize the world - Assad

Syrian President Bashar Assad warned that any foreign military intervention in the Syrian conflict would destabilize the entire world.

"I do not think that the West is moving in that direction, but if they do, no one can predict the consequences," said Assad in an interview with the Russian/Arabic-language TV channel "Rusia al-Yaum."

According to Bashar Assad foreign intervention in Syria would start a domino effect that would affect the whole world from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

Bashar Assad denied reports that he was going to leave the country.

Syria’s Assad offered asylum

Several nations have offered political asylum to Syria’s President Bashar Assad if he ever decides to leave the country, spokeswoman for the US Department of State Victoria Nuland said at a briefing today.

Ms. Nuland said some countries, including those in the Middle East, vowed to grant Mr. Assad and his family asylum. However she refused to name the states in question.

Earlier, UK Prime Minister David Cameron suggested that Bashar Assad could be allowed safe passage out of Syria.

“Of course, I would favour him facing the full force of international law and justice for what he's done,” Cameron said. “I am certainly not offering him an exit plan to Britain but if wants to leave, he could leave, that could be arranged,” he added.

Assad tells Russian TV he will 'live and die in Syria'

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Thursday rejected calls that he seek a safe exit, vowing he would "live and die in Syria", in an interview with Russian Arabic-language channel Rusiya Al-Yaum.

He also warned that a foreign intervention to deal with Syria's conflict would have "global consequences."

Assad does not see foreign intervention in Syria

President Bashar al-Assad said he does not see the West embarking on a military intervention in Syria and warned that the cost of such action would be unbearable, Russia Today reported on Thursday, citing an interview with him.

"I think that the cost of a foreign invasion of Syria - if it happens - would be bigger than the entire world can bear ... This will have a domino effect that will affect the world from the Atlantic to the Pacific," he said.

"I do not believe the West is heading in this direction, but if they do, nobody can tell what will happen afterwards," he said. The remarks were published in Arabic on Russia Today's web site.

Syria’s Assad offered asylum Syria’s Assad offered asylum

Several nations have offered political asylum to Syria’s President Bashar Assad if he ever decides to leave the country, spokeswoman for the US Department of State Victoria Nuland said at a briefing today.

Ms. Nuland said some countries, including those in the Middle East, vowed to grant Mr. Assad and his family asylum. However she refused to name the states in question.

Earlier, UK Prime Minister David Cameron suggested that Bashar Assad could be allowed safe passage out of Syria.

“Of course, I would favour him facing the full force of international law and justice for what he's done,” Cameron said. “I am certainly not offering him an exit plan to Britain but if wants to leave, he could leave, that could be arranged,” he added.

Voice of Russia, AFP, Interfax, Reuters, RT

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