29 July 2011, 18:15

News of the World workers offered jobs in Siberia

News of the World workers offered jobs in Siberia

Employees of the News of the World, the now-defunct News Corporation Sunday Tabloid have been offered jobs in Siberia. Almost 300 people lost their jobs but some of them managed to find places at publishing houses in London. Some others are being offered jobs at the companies abroad that are part of the Rupert Murdoch Empire.

Employees of the News of the World, the now-defunct News Corporation Sunday Tabloid have been offered jobs in Siberia. Almost 300 people lost their jobs but some of them managed to find places at publishing houses in London. Some others are being offered jobs at the companies abroad that are part of the Rupert Murdoch Empire. Here are more details from our London correspondent Elena Balaeva.

During interviews, Siberia is described to the former employees as a large country with wild life where air is not polluted and there are ample opportunities for career growth. Among the vacancies there is a material manager position at Fox News’s theoretical department in Siberia, which is a subdivision of Murdoch’s News Corporation that decided to win the Russian market. However, according to the daily Independent, western Siberia is associated with Gulag and journalists believe that such an offer is a punishment rather than an opportunity to make a new career.

Work in Siberia is only one out of 200 vacancies that are being offered to the former employees of News of the World. They can also choose to go to Bulgaria and work as “development consultant” at Dow Jones or “television products manager” in Spain, “assets inspector” in Italy or a “business inspector” in Sweden. In short, the former employees are offered to relocate to other countries. But not all are ready to accept this offer. The employees hope for something better, especially after Murdoch and the former News International Chief Executive Officer Rebekah Brooks assured the British parliamentarians that they would do their best to find jobs for all those who were not involved in illegal activities.

Altogether 283 people lost their jobs when the tabloid was closed following the phone hacking scandal. 60 out of them found jobs quickly in the companies belonging to the Murdoch Empire, including the daily Sun. However, the fate of others is still unclear.

  •  
    and share via