12 July 2011, 15:56

Moscow is growing

Moscow is growing

Moscow’s area will increase nearly 2.5 times. The Moscow Region is ready to make a generous present to the city – meaning to hand over 144,000 hectares to it. This is much more than Moscow has today.

Moscow’s area will increase nearly 2.5 times. The Moscow Region is ready to make a generous present to the city – meaning to hand over 144,000 hectares to it. This is much more than Moscow has today. However, you should not assess this gesture as the first step on the way of merging the Russian capital with the Moscow Region. What is really meant here is the broadening of Moscow’s borders.  

The city-building boom has not broken out spontaneously. The idea to broaden Moscow’s borders came into being long ago but only today it has begun acquiring shape. According to the general plan that was submitted to President Dmitry Medvedev by Moscow’s Mayor Sergei Sobyanin, the city will replace its monocentric system, whose main feature is that all roads lead to the Kremlin, by a polycentric one. New metro stations, railway stations, and an international financial centre will be built in Moscow’s new area. And this is exactly what Dmitry Medvedev said at a meeting with the participation of the Moscow Region Governor and the Mayor of Moscow:

"We’re facing the task of creating a new institution, or, to be more exact, a new entity, which will be of great significance for us. I mean the Moscow Financial Centre for which we must create an infrastructure of its own."

The President has also paid attention to the necessity of finding a solution to quite a number of other issues, which concern both Moscow’s life and the life of Moscow’s residents, and also the residents of the Moscow Region.

According to the new general plan, Moscow will get the territories in the southern and in the south-western regions, the Skolkovo Innograd, and the elite Moscow suburb Rublyovo-Arkhangelskoye, where the International Financial Centre will be located.  A new centre for federal ministries and departments will also be built on Moscow’s new territories, Moscow’s Mayor Sergei Sobyanin says:

"The new territories will make its possible to reduce the density of Moscow’s population by nearly 2-fold and will make the life in the city much more comfortable. The density of population on Moscow’s new lands will be less than in today’s Moscow. A great number of offices and also factories and plants will be transferred to the new territories, and as a result, Moscow will start breathing easier, and the density of its population will go down."

Another circumstance of importance is  that public sector employees – there’re about  25,000 of them in Moscow today – will leave  the present-day Moscow too, which will finally give a new breath of life to the historical  centre of the Russian capital. And one more thing here: the number of cars will decrease there as well.  

And still, the question arises whether Moscow and its residents will win as a result of the upcoming changes, the Governor of the Moscow Region Boris Gromov says:

"After Moscow’s borders are broadened, the land will rise in price. We’ve thoroughly studied the issue of the development of the whole Moscow Region, including its transportation system. Which means that the Moscow Region will become more attractive for investments."

However, one task still remains on the agenda for a long-term perspective. What is meant here is the establishment of a full-value Moscow federal district. And the current broadening of Moscow’s borders is the first step in this direction.

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